A room with a view

2nd floor space, St Vincent Plaza, Glasgow

2nd floor space, St Vincent Plaza, Glasgow

Walking around our Scottish cities and their grade-A-property districts, we often find ourselves looking up at the striking new architectural shapes that have been added to our familiar home-town skylines. Many of these buildings that are not being newly constructed are likely being refurbished, redesigned and improved internally to meet the requirements of a contemporary office or a modern hotel.

Edinburgh view | by McAteer Photograph

View towards Edinburgh Castle

View towards Edinburgh Castle | By McAteer Photograph

View towards Edinburgh Castle

A view of Edinburgh castle | By McAteer Photo

A view of Edinburgh castle

View towards Edinburgh Castle from 85 Princes Street | By McAteer Photograph

View towards Edinburgh Castle from 85 Princes Street

A view from 85 Princes Street, Edinburgh | By McAteer Photograph

A view from 85 Princes Street, Edinburgh

As architectural and interior photographers we are invited into places the public don’t usually see. Whether it’s to photograph new administration suites for national blue chip companies, refurbished retail floors in prime shopping locations or newly designed and fitted city hotel rooms, it’s likely that at least one interior space – be it a single room or an entire floor – will have interesting (if not amazing) views. It’s always a surprise to see the view outward that offers up a new and unique perspective of a city.

Edinburgh University | by McAteer Photograph

Informatics Forum Roof Garden, Edinburgh University with a view towards Arthur's Seat

View from Vita Student flats at Fountainbridge in Edinburgh | By McAteer Photograph

View from Vita's Student flats at Fountainbridge in Edinburgh

A view towards the Newhaven lighthouse and harbour | By McAteer Photograph

A view towards the Newhaven lighthouse and harbour

The technicalities of taking still photos of views varies depending on the what’s in the frame. It’s often necessary to either double-expose frames or light an interior to feature both the indoors and out in a good light. Double exposing requires careful set up and additional post production so it’s not for everyone but it does reduce the time and equipment required to just light an interior to create a balance with the outside view. However, taking the view from the window without having the room in the frame is an easier prospect as the photographer may just need a lens filter to darken the sky or employ some additional post production.

Bedroom with a view, Radisson Red | by McAteer Photograph

Radisson Red bedroom with a view of SSE Hydro

Looking south on Douglas Street | By McAteer Photograph

Looking south on Douglas Street

View towards IFSD from City of Glasgow College, Riverside Campus | By McAteer Photograph

View towards IFSD from City of Glasgow College, Riverside Campus

Of course, in most modern high rise buildings with air conditioning, the windows do not open so reflections have to be negated and dirty windows should be avoided at all costs in a commercial image. It could be said Windowlene and a duster is an essential part of that day’s kit!

George Square from 9 Merchant Square, Glasgow | By McAteer Photograph

George Square from 9 Merchant Square, Glasgow

George Square from Merchant House, Glasgow | By McAteer Photograph

View from the Merchant House towards George Square in Glasgow

North-west view from the old City of Glasgow College towards the Buchanan Galleries | By McAteer Photograph

North-west view from the old City of Glasgow College towards the Buchanan Galleries

North-east view from the Old City of Glasgow College towards the new campus | By McAteer Photograph

North-east view from the Old City of Glasgow College towards the new campus

South view from the old City of Glasgow College towards the G1 Building at George Square | By McAteer Photograph

South view from the old City of Glasgow College towards the G1 Building at George Square

We’re lucky enough to go where the general public can’t and that includes the balconies and roofs of many buildings to produce images showing cityscapes that the majority will never be able to see for themselves. The power and drama in a high rise image that is properly framed can’t be underestimated and with restrictions on drone photography in city centres, there’s sometimes no other option but to climb out hatches and stand on ledges – safely of course. So, the risk assessments are done and the personal protection equipment is packed for that day’s shoot – along with the Windolene!

View from the 9th floor of the Capella Building on York Street in Glasgow | By McAteer Photograph

South-west view from the 9th floor of the Capella Building on York Street in Glasgow

M8 from the 5th floor of the St Vincent Plaza, Glasgow | By McAteer Photograph

M8 from the 5th floor of the St Vincent Plaza, Glasgow

M8 overpass from the 5th floor of the St Vincent Plaza, Glasgow | By McAteer Photograph

M8 overpass from the 5th floor of the St Vincent Plaza, Glasgow

North-east view of St Vincent Street looking from the 5th floor of the St Vincent Plaza, Glasgow | By McAteer Photograph

North-east view of St Vincent Street looking from the 5th floor of the St Vincent Plaza, Glasgow

North-west view towards Gurdwara Singh Sabha and Kelvingrove Art Gallery in Glasgow | By McAteer Photograph

North-west view towards Gurdwara Singh Sabha and Kelvingrove Art Gallery in Glasgow

Looking west on Bothwell Street | By McAteer Photograph

Looking west on Bothwell Street

Having taken photographs from so many different structures around Scotland’s cities has given us an archive of truly unique images and we’ve been delighted to share some of our favourites with you.

Glasgow at dusk, looking north west | Glasgow

View of Glasgow looking north towards Ben Lomond at dusk

See more of our location shots in this gallery.